Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

We are changing direction today to LP vinyl playback.

Paul is saying that he believes the most important  aspects of vinyl playback are the tonearm and cartridge parts of a turntable.

Well I get this, but what about the phono stage, which is necessary to convert a tiny signal into a larger one suitable for playback through our stereos? It is this phono stage which also applies the EQ necessary for our records to sound right.

Perhaps, this is a case of “it is only as good as its weakest link”.

Which parts matter most?

Turntables can be expensive propositions, but the bulk of expense often lie in the table and platter themselves.

Yet sound quality wise, I would imagine the arm and cartridge to be bigger contributors.

It’s the age-old question of where to put money: in the chassis and connectors or the circuitry they serve? The table and platter, or the arm and cartridge that do the reproduction? The transport mechanism of a CD player, or the output circuitry it feeds?

Of course, we understand it all matters, but decisions must be made and it can be confusing knowing which parts matter most.

My advice is to put your trust in the judgment of the companies building the kit you desire.

Let the results of the overall product be your guide.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Some good stuff here

In answer to yesterday’s post about the Secret lives of Audiophiles, we got some great answers. Too many to reprint but I picked a few of my favorites.

“Really, you still listen to vinyl?
Yes, never stopped.

I gave my records away a long time ago.
I’m sure someone is still enjoying them…

I’ve got all my music on my phone, now.
Ummm…well I’ve got some music on my phone too but

Haha—can’t do that with records!
Well, actually, you could if you really wanted to but

Why wouldn’t you want to?
Hmmm…well…hey, look at the time—gotta run.”

And…

“Why do we need to explain it? Some people understand my passion for music and some don’t. I have been at it for 40 years (I am 54) and hope to get another 30 before I punch out, and hope to waste as little time as possible defending my interests to others during whatever time I have left. Now back to vinyl…”

Many shared their hesitation to brag or explain why they spent a lot. Completely understandable.

Or, my fellow manufacturer, Jim McCullough who writes:

“I would have answered your question with “Because they just won’t get it”, which is pretty much the same as “I am constantly misunderstood”.

And I too have changed from “My company makes high end audio equipment” to “My company makes stereo equipment”.

I now occasionally (actually more and more) get the Sonos variant on the Bose response: “Oh, you mean like Sonos”.”

But perhaps the best answer is the simplest. Most people don’t openly share their hobbies and passions with others because…well…that’s just not something we do. Who cares?

High-end audio is something that will likely remain a well-kept secret and that’s alright.

It’s ours.