Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

This is so true. I use EQ in my system and even the seemingly smallest of changes have big effects.

Circumstances

It’s been hot for the past week before last night’s rain and cold descended upon us. With morning’s first light the birds were happy; the worms, not so much. The sudden change brought an aviary feeding frenzy.

Unexpected change freaks us out. We like things to stay the way they are. Dammit! “Stop changing on me.”

Huron, the DAC upgrade we just launched, changed everything in Music Room one for the better. Everything, that is, but the bass. Without much fanfare the lowest end in the room just sort of went poof.

I hadn’t noticed it at first because I was too enamored with how much better everything else was. But then, over time, I began to miss the lowest notes, the pant flapping organ rushes.

There’s always been a bass suckout in Music Room One, and I’ve arranged the hot seat to take advantage of it. A few inches one way or the other changes bass levels rather a lot. Huron’s lowest frequency phase response is more accurate than Torry’s, and that small phase angle change moved the null about 8 inches—enough to change the delicate balance.

Took me a while to figure it out and move the woofer towers to compensate. Bingo! Bass is back. (Modern quality subwoofers have a phase adjustment to fix this).

The thing to remember is that any change you make to your system may necessitate other changes to bring sound quality back into alignment.

Don’t assume you can just slap something new into the mix and have it just work.

 

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Backing off

Several respected readers have suggested that my dogmatic stance against strict  audio measurements as the be-all-to-end-all has been aggressive. At times, disrespectful of other people’s views.

I think that’s a fair criticism and I want to work on fixing that.

When I am passionate on a point I tend to hammer it home. A character fault, to be sure. Aggression and disrespect have no place in this dialog and I’ll do my best to calm that part down. Not the passion or conviction, just the tone.

Repeating the same point with different words and examples can sometimes shine the light of understanding where once there was only darkness. That’s my hope when I bring up new meaning that might illuminate the discussion.

It’s not that one person’s right, the other wrong. It’s clear to me that we’re all after the same thing. Our worldviews just differ.

It’s like saying chocolate tastes bad and refusing to accept a contrary opinion on the matter. That’s a dead end street.

What we can continue to explore is the means of reaching a common understanding, and that is worth everything.