Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

For a small specialty audio company, PS Audio is one of the largest and getting larger. 42 people and counting.

Teamwork

Companies are groups of people coming together for a common purpose. We call this collection a team—a term also used by sports and horses. PS Audio’s team now numbers 42, quite large from the original 2 of me and Stan.

Teams aren’t faceless. Each person within the team brings a lifetime of experience and stories; family and memories; love and dedication; purpose and determination. It is the rich and cumulative experience of the team that defines any company, for better or for worse. In our case, the better. We have an extraordinary group that design, build, package, and account for all things PS Audio.

Take for example our CFO, Keenan Haga, who runs a marathon every week. He’s run so many of these 26-mile races that after completing his first 50 (one in each state), he’s decided to go for his second. And early next year he’ll run a marathon in Antarctica.

Or, senior software developer Tyera Eulberg, captain of the USA Women’s Underwater Hockey Team. Yes, indeed, you have that right. Check out this NHL video of Tyera.

Or, senior programmer Barry Solway, an author, engineer, software developer, writer, dancer, martial artist and a former Marine. His latest book, Gladiator, is a sci-fi thriller that is a real page-turner.

And these two are only part of a great team that come together 5 days a week to build the best audio products on the planet and take care of our greatest asset, our customers.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

When transparency is the goal

What we hope for in any piece of stereo equipment is sonic transparency. We get there by practicing the Hippocratic oath, “First, do no harm.”

And while this is all well and good the facts are unfortunately not in our favor. All electronics affect the signal in some way: robbing or adding. There’s no such thing as harmless.

What we practitioners of the art can strive for is to leave as small a musically agreeable footprint as possible—to do no harm, and what little impact we have should be toe-tapping good.

At least when transparency’s the goal.