Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

The loss of an old friend

Our new listening rooms are finished and ready to start life which means today is the end of one era and the beginning of another. I am not sure whether to be sad or excited. I suppose it’s a bit of both. The fact that I have been stressing over what musical piece will be the last played in Music Room One is probable evidence it’s the former emotion at stake.

Music Room One has a long and very personal history for me. Well more than a decade ago I staked my claim on a patch of real estate in our warehouse and we built a free-standing room to serve as our reference lab and musical showcase. That room has hosted Avalons, Magnepans, Revels, and finally the IRSV. It’s also hosted and entertained hundreds upon hundreds of visitors and dignitaries.

And now she’s the last bastion standing in an empty building waiting for new occupants. Today is her last day of operation and tomorrow she finds her new home.

Our aspirations are for a better audio experience yet better is a word that is too encompassing.

The fact of the matter is that it will never be the same—a true double-edged sword.

PS engineer Darren Myers and I posted a video you might want to watch. Go here to see the last of Music Room One and the first of its new home.

I’ll keep you updated on the progress of the move.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Natural sounding

Another word for musical to describe the sound of unadulterated audio reproduction might be natural. It’s a good and reasonable alternative but I fear out of our reach unless we’re willing to make drastic changes.

Natural implies straight from nature without any intervention from us. Picking an apple off a wild tree might qualify, but listening to a commercial recording likely would not. In the real world we pluck an apple off the supermarket shelf and hope it tastes as good as that tree-ripened gem, but alas, it never does.

If you’re not making the recording and shepherding every step of the process through to your ears you’re not likely to ever achieve true natural sound. Yet, maybe that’s ok.

Most of us are into our systems and enjoying their gifts for the magic they bring us. Music through a properly set up system is such an amazing experience that the notion it’s not quite as good as being there pales to just the sheer enjoyment of it all.

No, terms like natural and musical help convey levels of performance in conversation but aren’t requirements for perfection.