Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Music of the spheres

Musica Universalis, also called Music of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept suggesting the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—are forms of music, a kind of definable “hum” that affects everything in life.

Ancient philosophers concluded music didn’t just mimic the motions of celestial bodies, it was the result of their motions.

The Greek philosopher, Pythagoras, went a step further by figuring out that specific intervals between harmonious and discordant sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios. A formula could define what would be pleasant or disagreeable to the ear.

Not much has changed in the nearly 3,000 years since Pythagoras figured out the relationships that define music (it was he that also first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in inverse proportion to the length of the string that produces it).

Pythagoras believed the quality of life on Earth reflects the tenor of celestial sounds as well as those earthbound notes.

We couldn’t agree more.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

The language of sound

We spend so many words describing sound it’s a shame we cannot easily demonstrate it instead.

When I hear something new like better openness or increased depth of soundstage in a fresh design, it is instantly recognized. I don’t need more than a brief moment to hear those differences any more than the time it takes to witness a visual change. But, trying to then communicate those differences with language alone becomes a serious challenge.

What a perfect opportunity for the proverbial magic wand. I could wave that tiny baton at my system and anyone wishing to experience what I just heard could join the party.

Words would no longer be needed.

I’ve had a little success with recording changes in sound with my video camera—and shared them with our YouTube audience—a mind-numbing fact when you consider the quality of the cameras’ internal microphone.

The best way to brush past the need for language is a great home audio system.