Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Bright side

Looking on the bright side seems socially acceptable while listening on the bright side is to be avoided.

This kind of makes sense since we tolerate optimists but run from aggressive audio.

The meanings are different and in interesting ways.

The bright side of life—or the sunny side of the street (your choice)—is where we see ourselves basking in the light of a path without hurdles: skewed towards more of the positive attributes.

Listening to a bright audio system implies an aggressive uneven balance of sound: skewed towards the upper registers at the expense of the mids and lower regions—glaring. And, glare is something to be avoided.

As a lifelong optimist (to the point of blindsiding myself to the negative), I often see the world differently than others.

That’s alright since I believe we can all agree ’tis better to enjoy what works in our music systems then stress about what doesn’t.

Nothing’s perfect except the joy we feel connecting with music.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Making the most of it

Engineers work with compromise because there are no design projects without limitations. Even the most exotic projects run up against the laws of physics from time to time.

Which is why we often confuse the word compromise with failure. It is not a failing to compromise, it’s what we all do to make things work.

In fact, we can safely suggest that engineering is the art of compromise. If we’re engineering a bridge we have to set limits. One view of those limitations sounds like a failure: the bridge can’t support the weight of an army tank. But, it wasn’t designed to. A more relevant view is to ask whether or not it meets or exceeds spec.

Exceeding our goals doesn’t sound like compromise, and it certainly doesn’t sound like failure. In fact, we’ve made the most out of what we have to work with.

When you’re judging a piece of audio gear it’s perhaps more important to evaluate it on how closely it meets expectations rather than ticking off a list of what it lacks.

No product has everything. The question should be, does it have what you want?