Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

Intimacy

Sounds like the start of a steamy romance novel, right? Intimacy, as it pertains to our high-end audio systems, is such a great word because it describes how close we can get to the music. To become one with the artist or the work.

One of the great measures of how well a stereo system is working is its ability to connect you directly to the artist or the work. That despite the maze of wires, tubes, chassis, boxes, diffusers, and mishegas required to reproduce music in our homes, we cut right through to the heart and soul of the matter.

Some audiophiles rely on foot tapping as their measure of performance, others on the degree music moves them—and I have heard it described too as immediacy. For me, it’s intimacy. How close does my system get me into the music?

The closer I get the more connected I am—and whatever upgrades, setup procedures, or work is required to get there, it’s the intimacy that draws me like a moth to the flame.

How close are you to yours?

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

Necessary evil

When I plant my garden there will inevitably be weeds—necessary evils of vine-ripened veggies.

Similarly, when I set up a stereo system based on separates, cables become my necessary evil. They’ll never make things better—an endless source of compromise and patchwork Band Aids.

The trick to dealing with these inevitable hindrances is a mindset change where they become more consequence than evil: the end result of building complex systems.

For example, I can view the need for acoustic room treatments as a natural consequence of wanting great sound or a necessary evil of playing a stereo speaker pair in a non-perfect room.

Thinking of problems as either natural consequences to be solved or evils to be expunged may be little more than semantic debate but, for me, it changes my outlook.

Consequences are easier to deal with than attempting to eradicate evil.