Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

Class F amps? I don’t know Class F amps, but in my experience, Class A, class A/B and Class D amps can all sound great, although Class A always seem to be my personal favorite,

Alphabet amps

Power amplifiers come in classes determined by their design. Their classifications are listed by simple letters of the alphabet, but underlying that simplicity is a whole lot of complexity.

For example, amp classes as determined by their bias and turn-on cycle include A, AB, B, and C. The differences in this class of amps is determined by how much constant power they consume and when their output stage turns on and off.

Class H amplifiers are different. Their amp circuitry is rather common but their power supplies are variable: only a little voltage for small audio signals and jumping to big voltage outputs as the music gets louder.

And Class D amps are entirely different in the way they work altogether. These, of course, are Pulse Width Modulated amplifiers that work in fundamentally different ways than an analog amplifier.

Because of the similarity in nomenclature of amp classes (using the alphabet for classifications) it’s easy to think that amp classes are related to each other.

But that wouldn’t be accurate.

A, B, C, D, and F may be simple letters but the science behind them is a lot more complex.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

We also had plastic covered couches and not even any pets!!

Well protected

The mother of one of our family’s dear friends, Dr. Stu, always amazed me. Her New York home located somewhere out in the wilds of Long Island, featured really nice looking furniture covered in plastic. Yup. Plastic.

And the thing was for all the years they owned that furniture the plastic never came off. Not once did anyone in that family ever feel the actual fabric the couch and chairs were made of.

This over-protection always boggled my mind. To this day I have never understood the logic of covering up furniture so that on the day one sells it’s as new.

Protection has its place. Terri will often put a blanket over our couch when the grandkids come over. But after they leave, we can again enjoy the fabric’s soft feel.

Amps are protected in a way that allows their full use nearly all the time. Only in the rare case where you’ve exceeded their power limitations are you thrown out of the music and required to go reset the amp.

Protection for extraordinary circumstances makes sense to me.

Protection to the point of never actually using something is about as bizarre a concept as I can imagine.

Our cool stuff needs to be used!