Tag Archives: Audio Equipment

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

Nothing’s the same

It is of endless fascination to me how unique our systems are. There’s nothing in the world like Music Room Two and nothing sounds the same either.

And what you have in your home is as unique as mine. No one has the same room, furniture, setup, altitude, humidity, flooring, audio equipment, video equipment and cabling that you do. And, it all matters to the end result.

Which is why it’s important to take advice from others with a grain of salt. I can advise you all day long to try this cable, swap out that amp for another, or reposition your system in a certain way, but that advice cannot be faithfully followed without self-evaluation.

It is up to each of us to choose what works for us. We evaluate our choices by listening to the end result.

If our systems reproduce music in ways that move us emotionally—connecting us closer to the artist—then our unique setup is working.

There are many things in this life we share, but our systems are not one of them.

They are as unique as we are.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Nagging questions

I’m often asked the same question: If the ultimate goal is to perfectly recreate what was on the recording, then why wouldn’t we be duplicating the monitoring systems in recording studios?

It’s a great logic puzzle because it seems so obvious. If we had what the recording engineer had then we’d hear what they hear.

Like so many puzzles were stumped because the question has a not so obvious flaw. As proposed there’s only one answer. Yes. If we stood in the same room with the same audio equipment then we would hear exactly the same thing. But here’s the rub. Unless we’re thinking about duplicating in its entirety a recording studio control room, and only listen to the very same track mastered in that very room, the argument begins to fall apart.

Our stereo systems have to accommodate all sorts of recordings and do so evenly without favor to one type or another. This is one of the reasons I have my list of tracks that vary in quality and content across a broad spectrum of music.

It’s a great question, but the answer reveals more than one might expect.

We are not trying to duplicate anything other than the sound of music.