Tag Archives: audio

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Design recipes

Our audio design process is like a recipe: 1 part inspiration, 1 part prior art, 1/2 a textbook circuit, a dash of proprietary technology, shake well, measure, then listen. If it doesn’t hit the mark, it’s back to the tweak bench or the drawing board.

The end result of a food recipe is the dinner table. For PS Audio’s equipment designs, it’s the listening room.

People often ask us what the ingredients in the listening room are. My answer changes from week to week as we gather new music, retire some of the tired hits, or renew classics to see how much progress we’ve made.

If you have Qobuz you can load PS Audio’s Reference Playlist into your system and see (or rather hear) for yourself.

https://open.qobuz.com/playlist/2198171

You can even load this into a simple web browser to enjoy a partial taste of the tracks we use as reference quality music.

Whether it’s food or design recipes, what matters is how they make you feel.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Roughcut or polish?

Whether one is cutting a gemstone or building a high-performance music system, it’s helpful to identify the order of work that brings the best results. You want to polish after the perfect cut, and not before.

How many times have I lived through an endless parade of tweaks before realizing no amount of polish can fix an audio or video  component that needs upgrading? The most expensive audio cables and isolators in the world can’t fix a mediocre component.

Whether you’re starting fresh or working with a year’s old system, it’s always best to step back from the whole and examine your precepts of the components within. That amplifier you’re so fond of. Does it really meet your expectations? Or the DAC, preamp, or speakers?

It’s easier to upgrade a cable or USB isolator than the DAC itself, yet that may not always yield the results we hope for.

Sometimes it pays to reexamine our basic premise.

You can polish a gem to a bright luster, but it’ll never be as satisfying as the perfect cut.