Tag Archives: bass

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Maybe boring, but I have several tracks I use to set stereo’s up. Some are for tone…Some are for dynamics…Some are for bass and some are for stereo imaging.

One of the biggest mistakes people at shows make, although becoming more rare, are stereo’s that use components that haven’t been used together, especially loudspeakers, audio components that are new and not broken in,  or systems that don’t use the right music for set up.

Simple and natural

There are literally millions of tracks we can use to evaluate our stereo system setups, yet most wouldn’t be of much help. Without some form of acoustic reference material, it’s nearly impossible to know when it is right or wrong. What’s the proper sound of a fuzz tone guitar? Unless you had attended a Jimmy Hendrix concert in your youth (and had a perfect memory), you’d be hard pressed to know if a modern system rendered his guitar properly.

Whenever I start to set up a system I do my best to keep my source material simple and natural: a familiar voice, an acoustic instrument I know well. The more familiar I am with the piece, the easier it is to know when I’ve nailed the tonal balance, imaging, and dynamics.

What’s wonderful is we don’t need to use the same tracks all the time. As long as we stick to the principles of simple, natural, and familiar, just about any track works equally well.

Perhaps the biggest mistake I see people making when setting up systems is the use of big, complex, unfamiliar music or, worse, electronic music without any known reference.

When setting up, always go back to basics.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Thrill seeking

Now that PS Audio engineer Chris Brunhaver has rebuilt the Infinity IRS woofer sections in Music Room II, tracks of music that once overloaded the room or underwhelmed the listener are back on the table.

Tracks like Deeper by Pete Belasco, When the Party’s Over by Billy Eilish, or Handel’s Organ Concerto Number 3 suddenly make more sense.

Before the woofer change, there was plenty of deep bass but it was more an effect sound than a real live note. Now, the system sends chills up your spine when those notes move both you and the room.

In fact, one of the joys of an upgrade to your audio or video system is the opening of new musical opportunities. If it’s better bass, you start looking through your library for tracks that demonstrate the new prowess. If a new tweeter or speakers with airy extended highs, you search for more thrills in that music.

If you want a few thrills and chills to challenge your system, and have Qobuz, you can access what we listen to by going here.

Have fun and give my apologies to the neighbors.