Tag Archives: cd

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Weird to wonderful

Bringing new ideas, concepts, and radical change to an established way of doing things requires great effort—moving from weird to wonderful.

Imagine just a few of the major shifts within our lifetimes: vacuum tubes to solid-state amplifiers, vinyl to CD, LP records to audio streaming. Each and every shift began life as the weird and only over time moved into the wonderful.

In my father’s era, change came slowly. I remember him as being amongst a handful of pioneers separating speakers drivers from console HiFi’s and building separate enclosures. This was radical stuff as nearly all music reproduction systems were confined to a single box replete with everything needed to play music. It would be another decade or so that separate box speakers crept into the collective, and multiple decades after that for the electronics to separate into what we think of today as standard fare.

As a modern collective of audio lovers, we’ve had to adjust our acceptance levels with respect to the speed of change. What might have sent my father’s head spinning seems normal to us. In fact, many are impatient for the next big breakthrough to come our way.

The pace of change is increasing. This excites me personally as I have always been impatient to experience (or cause) the next great revolution.

Where do you sit when it comes to change?

Does it feel weird or wonderful?

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

RIP iTunes…..

A passing in the Hi-Fi Family

On January 9, 2001, Universal Records dusted off the 25th-anniversary edition of “Frampton Comes Alive” as well as a deluxe edition of the one and only record by one of rock’s first supergroups – Blind Faith, and released them on CD.

Something else happened to music on that same January day as Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced a new music management format that forever changed the world of music.

Originally, iTunes was called SoundJam MP, a program developed outside Apple by developers Casady & Greene in 1998. The tagline for the first version of iTunes was “World’s Best and Easiest To Use Jukebox Software”.

With the introduction of iTunes, the late Steve Jobs hoped to help the music business navigate out of the Napster free-for-all that was devastating companies’ bottom lines.

“The record companies are in a difficult situation because people want to buy their music online, but there’s no real way to do it, so they steal it,” Jobs said. “The users are in a bad situation because most of them don’t want to steal music online, but there’s no other way to get it that’s any good.” Jobs proposed iTunes as “a middle way, a middle path out of this.”

Spotify’s rise upended Apple’s domination, part of a technological shift toward streaming.

June 3, 2019, will mark the end of an 18-year run that kick-started the digital commerce revolution. For better or worse, without Apple’s experiment, the ways in which culture consumes entertainment wouldn’t be the same.

iTunes changed the world.