Tag Archives: digital

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Keeping it personal

Emotions, as well as passions, run deep in high-end audio and that’s one of the reasons I am personally invested in it.

In our discussions on preferences for the various camps of reproduction—like vinyl vs. digital—emotions sometimes run as deep as political differences between Democrats and Republicans. I’ve seen near fist fights erupt at audio shows.

When both our emotions and pocketbooks are heavily invested it’s pretty natural to want to defend our decisions.

What’s perhaps good to remember is not our differences but our sameness. Just like our political divides, I believe we are all after the same things. We just differ in our opinions on how to get there.

I don’t always agree with those calling for the discussions to get less heated—not if the lowering of temperature means a lessening of passion. It’s passion that I love and want to continue.

What would happen if we kept in mind what we have in common? That we share a mutual goal of quality reproduction of music.

Would it be possible to remain as passionate about our differences without thinking less of those that disagree?

We are all interested in the same things.

I hope we never agree on how best to get there.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Digital gaps

It’s common wisdom that because digital breaks up sound into bits there’s missing information between those bits—information not lost with analog. But is that accurate?

The comparison between the uninterrupted straight line picture of analog and the chunky digital copy might lead us to imagine differences that don’t necessarily exist.

If I were to side with the measurementists I could pretty definitively demonstrate there is nothing measurably missing in a proper digital recording.

If were to then take the opposite side and agree with the analog proponents that correctly point out the audible differences between digital recordings and analog recordings, we would then be at a stalemate.

If nothing is missing in digital what explains the differences in sound quality?

We can say with absolute certainty that a PCM recording of a live music feed sounds different than an analog or DSD recording of the same event.

Yet, it is also true that a PCM recording of the analog playback is nearly indistinguishable from the analog playback.

Tomorrow I am going to suggest what might be going on.