Tag Archives: digital

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Giving yourself permission

We’re a funny lot. If we’ve set some sort of goal or restriction we work hard to stick to it regardless of the outcome. Like promising yourself not to eat French fries, or never play music from Tony Orlando.

But then something changes and you’re faced with a new set of temptations. You don’t want to break your promise to yourself but heck, circumstances have changed. Right? So we give ourselves permission to violate the agreement just this once. Those fries were hand-cut and not the frozen kind, and Tony’s new single did get rave reviews.

Life’s full of guilty pleasures and giving yourself permission to enjoy a few is alright.

You’re convinced digital is king and that analog is antiquated. Or Tidal sounds better than Qobuz, XLR tromps RCA, you should purchase only from a dealer, horn speakers are old fashioned.

When change is in the air, give yourself permission to open up just a smidgen.

That small opening of acceptability can often lead to discovery of the new and exciting.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Most Telarc recordings I have heard sound bad, so this becomes even more interesting to me. I would have stuck with the analog.

Which would you choose?

Raul Montilla from Puerto Rico sent me a kind note about an interesting experiment from years past. In it, Jack Renner and the engineers from Telarc are said to have recorded the Cleveland Orchestra on both an analog tape recorder and a Soundstream Digital recorder. They then compared the output of the two and all selected the analog tape version as being more musical.

To most of us that doesn’t sound so far fetched. What they did next might stand a few hairs on end.

Curious why their new digital recorder didn’t sound as good as the older analog tape they ran a second set of experiments. In this round, they had the orchestra play again and as they did the engineers switched between the live sound and the output of both recorders. To their surprise, the digital recorder’s output was indistinguishable from the live feed while the analog’s output softened the highs, compressed the strong bass, and added a type of pleasant coloration.

This convinced them to abandon the analog recorder and stick with the Soundstream (and later others) and thus the label Telarc was born. Not everyone would have made that choice.

Which would you have chosen?