Tag Archives: electronics

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

The Do Over

We’ve all made mistakes and I’ve made many. In fact, I’ve made so many I am getting proficient at fixing them, covering up their trail of destruction and moving forward in the hopes of not repeating them.

One thing I’ve learned from my mistakes is the Do Over. That sometimes it’s not good enough to clean up the mess. Better to start over and get it right.

The Do Over is a hard lesson but oh so valuable, especially when it relates to your stereo system. If you’ve started out with that perfect set of loudspeakers before following it with some poor choices in electronics and cables, I have always found it preferable—though painful—to start over instead of trying to fix the problem.

When we choose active room correction, warm-cables to soften harsh-electronics, blocks and magic discs to quiet power supplies, we’re often aiding and abetting a failed set of purchases.

Sometimes we haven’t a choice. Economics, room restrictions, and any number of hurdles get in our way.

But, given enough freedom, it’s often better to go for The Do Over than the Band-Aid.

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Weaverville, Waynesville, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Adding voice to audio equipment

It’s hard to imagine cooking a fine meal without ever tasting the food, or designing a loudspeaker without listening to the final product. That sort of arms-length-design is more a crapshoot than a surefire success.

Yet, when we talk about PS Audio’s design process for electronics that spends more time on voicing than measurement, eyes roll.

I can’t think another engineered product category other than audio that makes people so nuts when it comes to design by use. We wouldn’t expect a car company to deliver a vehicle they didn’t test drive or a drug that wasn’t tried on real people. Why the guffaws and snark smiles when it comes to voicing amplifiers, CD players, and DACs?

Do we honestly believe measurements say it all? That in this one tiny piece of the universe all is known and no tasting, listening, experiencing, is necessary?

It hardly seems to make sense.