Tag Archives: iPhone

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

What’s something worth?

My iPhone X retails for $1,000 at the Apple store. That’s a lot. It’s one of the most expensive mobile phones on the market and it could be argued it’s at the top of the expense heap. And yet, if that were a high-end DAC or power amplifier it would be on the extreme low end. And, what’s tough about that equation is the level of technology and parts in an iPhone is a magnitude more expensive and sophisticated than any DAC.

Now, it should be noted that millions of iPhones are manufactured each year compared to thousands of DACs. Economies of scale certainly play a big role in pricing. That said, the chasm between an expensive DAC and a technological wonder like the iPhone cannot be explained entirely by scale.

Pricing strategies have a myriad of formula. Some are priced according to marketplace expectations, some a fixed formula of parts and labor. Still others are boastful of being the most expensive, or the cheapest.

When I judge value I look at a lot of factors: importance of the product to me, other models in the market, need, scarcity or abundance, the company story and its founder’s philosophies.

What a product is worth is up to each buyer and its value to them, not what’s necessarily fair or equitable to charge.

 

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Update changes

We are truly creatures of habit. We get into a comfortable routine and we don’t want to leave. Change comes along to yank us out of our reverie and we can take one of three paths: object, ignore, adapt.

We just launched new Bridge firmware—the very essence of change. Most people will install the new firmware and enjoy the benefits of the improvements without question or comment, while others will hold off until it’s shown itself as stable. Still others will avoid pushing the button for change because “it’s working fine”.

This is perfectly normal behavior and one reason few products come with automatic updates without asking. For me, I’d prefer auto updates without asking. Just take care of it and don’t piss me off with the new changes. Delight me. My iPhone used to work pretty much like that, though they did ask if I wanted to update. My new car works exactly like that. Software updates seem to happen as if by magic and so far they’ve only been for the better.

My inclination is to have our upcoming music management program, Octave, update automatically without bothering customers. You wake up in the morning and things are simply better. But, I know this would send both howls of protest as well as thanks our way.

Maybe a solution would be to offer the auto-update service to folks like me who don’t want to bother with updates and let others choose.

Or, maybe not.