Tag Archives: loudspeaker

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl

This may work for some, but depends on type and size of the loudspeaker, as well as the listening room. The Red Norvo piece of music is great!

Tilt ‘er back

If you’re looking for a quick and easy fine-tuning technique, try tilting the speakers forward or backward relative to the listening position.

This is a time-honored tweak that not everyone’s familiar with, but it sure works great. The easiest way to do this is by using a CD jewel case under the front of your speaker for tilt back or under the rear of the speaker for tilt-forward. The half inch or so depth of a CD case is about perfect for a tilt change. You can use multiple cases to arrive at your final position.

What you’re doing is aiming the tweeter slightly above or below your ear—off-axis. Tilt back and above your ear will open the soundstage and offer a more airy presentation. Tilt forward and the opposite happens.

For this exercise, I like to start a well recorded multi-instrument piece like Reference Recording’s Red Norvo How’s your mother in law. As I tilt back the speaker the image gets deeper, wider, and more open, but it also loses a bit of upper harmonic energy. Heading in the opposite direction I increase the HF energy (depending on how your tweeters are now aimed) and gain more life.

Once that recording is dialed in I put on one of my favorite setup discs, Buddy Holly’s True Love’s Ways. Here I am listening for the immediacy of the voice and make my final tweaks to get it just right.

Nice to have an easy tweak we can try at home.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Mon, Jun 22 at 5:01 AM
Rocks and hard places
When designing a loudspeaker one of the most difficult problems turns out to be the crossover. Marrying the falling response of the woofer as it climbs higher in frequency to the opposite response of the tweeter is almost never going to be perfect.

And so one might suggest that a single driver designed to cover all frequencies would be best, only, now you introduced another kind of distortion where slow moving bass notes modulate the higher frequencies our ears are so sensitive to.

Dang. Can’t win for losing when we’re up against a rock and a hard place. What’s a designer to do?

Compromise by finding the solution with the fewest problems and the best chances for optimization. That’s what we engineers do, regardless of what we’re attempting to engineer.

It’s not very glamorous writing about compromise because as audio perfectionists we don’t like to think in those terms. We’d rather use words like optimization, words that too are accurate depending on one’s viewpoint.

It’s important to know the thought processes, aims, goals, and success rates of the designers and company’s you want to work with. Did they make the best choices for sound quality and performance? Do they have the same goals in mind as you?

After all, we wouldn’t want to compromise.