Tag Archives: loudspeakers

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Please see PS Audio’s website for pictures!

Bits and pieces

We’re dipping into a bit of the past with this post but I thought you might find it of interest.

As you read this we’re tearing down the finished AN3 loudspeakers we’ve been laboring over and putting them on a truck for tomorrow’s setup day at RMAF.

Over the past few weeks, it’s been a whirlwind of change and work getting to this point and I haven’t had much of a breather to share the “sausage-making” behind the scenes shots, so forgive me.

As some may remember, the new construction for AN3 is in two boxes, a top cabinet with the twin midbass woofers, and the coaxial ribbon midrange and tweeter. The bottom cabinet is all subwoofer with its frightening 12″ beast and 700-watt amplifier. Here, have a look:

This will give you a better idea of how that works. The finished cabinets aren’t that heavy and even I can easily lift one and pop it onto the sub cabinet. From there, it’s easy to add the side fastener that tie the two together. On the rear of the speaker are multiple sets of binding posts where the top and bottom cabinet’s audio signal are connected via supplied jumpers. I’ll send you pictures of what this looks like when I get a chance.

Below are even more pictures. You can see a closeup of the new custom ribbon coax midrange Chris designed, the custom leveling hardware on the base, and what the new woofer looks like peeking through the side panel.

Tomorrow it’s all hands on deck at the show set up day.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Setting a high bar

We work so hard achieving sonic purity that it’s easy to forget just how flawed some of our tools are. Microphones and loudspeakers, for example, are so far away from neutral that we accept their colorations as normal. I am not sure that’s a very high bar from which to set standards.

My friend Dan Schwartz has developed enough of an ear to identify which microphone was used in many recordings. The fact that microphones have so many colorations as to be identifiable from just listening is pretty telling and we haven’t even scratched the surface. Walk the halls of a HiFi show and listen to how wildly different music sounds from room to room.

To me, this is a good news, bad news situation. On the one hand, there’s enormous room for improvement in our reproduction chains, something that always gets me excited as we delve deep into making better sound systems for the home. On the other hand, it’s a little unnerving to consider how much further we have to go.

As we move forward by building better speakers and using only the best microphones to capture music, my hope is we reset our standards. That once we hear better we will be unwilling to settle for what was once “normal”.

Progress has many benefits, but the one that makes me smile is setting the bar high enough that we’re unwilling to accept less in the future.

A high bar helps us all.