Tag Archives: Spotify

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Recommended music

When we flip through some of the more mainstream streaming services like Netflix, Pandora, Spotify, and Apple Music, we’re often not surprised when they make recommendations to us that fit our profile. I stream a weird combination of opera, jazz and dance music, yet the recommendations for me on Spotify line up pretty well at times.

Machine learning using comparative data strings is becoming increasingly commonplace in our artificial intelligence centric world. I note that the music server Roon is dabbling in a version of this based on their connected community. PS Audio did the same thing nearly a decade ago with our PerfectWave Transport and its online cover art library.

While this trend towards automation and relying upon machines for this work might seem new and novel, the basic ideas of how music gets recommended is as old as distributed music itself. In the earliest days of recorded music, record stores featured the most popular selling discs. Move forward to radio and you’ll find DJs and music directors playing “the hits”. Today, we share our favorites via forums.

Sharing and recommending movies and music is a valuable community endeavor regardless of how the data is gathered, organized, and distributed.

Music is meant to be shared.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

RIP iTunes…..

A passing in the Hi-Fi Family

On January 9, 2001, Universal Records dusted off the 25th-anniversary edition of “Frampton Comes Alive” as well as a deluxe edition of the one and only record by one of rock’s first supergroups – Blind Faith, and released them on CD.

Something else happened to music on that same January day as Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced a new music management format that forever changed the world of music.

Originally, iTunes was called SoundJam MP, a program developed outside Apple by developers Casady & Greene in 1998. The tagline for the first version of iTunes was “World’s Best and Easiest To Use Jukebox Software”.

With the introduction of iTunes, the late Steve Jobs hoped to help the music business navigate out of the Napster free-for-all that was devastating companies’ bottom lines.

“The record companies are in a difficult situation because people want to buy their music online, but there’s no real way to do it, so they steal it,” Jobs said. “The users are in a bad situation because most of them don’t want to steal music online, but there’s no other way to get it that’s any good.” Jobs proposed iTunes as “a middle way, a middle path out of this.”

Spotify’s rise upended Apple’s domination, part of a technological shift toward streaming.

June 3, 2019, will mark the end of an 18-year run that kick-started the digital commerce revolution. For better or worse, without Apple’s experiment, the ways in which culture consumes entertainment wouldn’t be the same.

iTunes changed the world.