Tag Archives: Stellar

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Weaverville, Waynesville, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Approachable

One of the PS Audio Rooms at Axpona has their more inexpensive lines of Stellar audio electronics., showing with a moderately expensive Golden Ear loudspeaker, which aren’t much to look at, but sound pretty good. Guessing the system sounds pretty darn good.

Note the lack of our best efforts. No BHK. No DirectStream. No Wilson speakers or Focal speakers.

What’s going on? Why a Stellar Stack? Why approachable speakers like the Tritons?

Sometimes it’s worth showing what can be done with approachable. That we don’t always have to bring out the finest china and silver. That it’s ok to proudly share with people what can be done with $12K all in.

For me this is fun. I think the system sounds great and exemplifies all that is great with going the opposite of pedal to the metal.

After all, it doesn’t have to cost a lot to shine.

 

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

From Paul..

We’re rarely wrong

Before I get into the substance of today’s post I wanted to apologize. A snafu on the website prevented a number of customers from ordering Stellar beta units. The problem’s been fixed.

There are still units left. If you want to participate in the Stellar Beta test, click on this link.

My apologies for the website error. Use the drop down menu next to the pricing to select which Stellar products – stereo or mono amp, Gain Cell DAC, or combination you want to play with. The trade in box works now as well.

Good luck!

We are rarely wrong when it comes to what we hear, but often incorrect as to why.

I’ll offer you an example of a multi-driver loudspeaker vs. a single all-range.

If you were to listen to a poorly executed two-way speaker design, most would instantly hear the crossover point between tweeter and woofer.

That’s the easy part.

The problem comes into play if you make the erroneous conclusion that multi-driver loudspeakers are flawed by design. They are not.

A properly designed multi-driver system is seamless.

We’re rarely wrong in what we hear. We’re sometimes wrong when we assign blame as to why.

Understanding the difference is critical to your success in building a system.