Tag Archives: subwoofer

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Please see PS Audio’s website for pictures!

Bits and pieces

We’re dipping into a bit of the past with this post but I thought you might find it of interest.

As you read this we’re tearing down the finished AN3 loudspeakers we’ve been laboring over and putting them on a truck for tomorrow’s setup day at RMAF.

Over the past few weeks, it’s been a whirlwind of change and work getting to this point and I haven’t had much of a breather to share the “sausage-making” behind the scenes shots, so forgive me.

As some may remember, the new construction for AN3 is in two boxes, a top cabinet with the twin midbass woofers, and the coaxial ribbon midrange and tweeter. The bottom cabinet is all subwoofer with its frightening 12″ beast and 700-watt amplifier. Here, have a look:

This will give you a better idea of how that works. The finished cabinets aren’t that heavy and even I can easily lift one and pop it onto the sub cabinet. From there, it’s easy to add the side fastener that tie the two together. On the rear of the speaker are multiple sets of binding posts where the top and bottom cabinet’s audio signal are connected via supplied jumpers. I’ll send you pictures of what this looks like when I get a chance.

Below are even more pictures. You can see a closeup of the new custom ribbon coax midrange Chris designed, the custom leveling hardware on the base, and what the new woofer looks like peeking through the side panel.

Tomorrow it’s all hands on deck at the show set up day.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

If a tree falls…

…in the forest and there’s no one to witness, does it make a sound? We all know the answer to this question because we understand the mechanism of sound, but the old chestnut gets one to think.

How much do hidden sounds impact our world?

If your audio or video electronics pass all the details in the music to speakers unable to fully reproduce those details, does it make sense to afford high-resolution electronics?

I think this is the same question people ponder when contemplating the addition of a subwoofer. Most music has very little in the way of subsonics, yet subwoofers offer a presence that cannot be achieved without them.

It is the reproduction of hidden cues that can influence what we perceive: Extended phase response can help the highs sound more present. Quicker transients improve plosives. Lower noise levels blacken backgrounds. Subwoofers extend realism.

It is not always the obvious we should focus on. Sometimes, it’s the hidden gems that make magic.