Tag Archives: turntable

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Tweaking vs. tuning

There comes a point in our stereo journey where we have to decide whether it’s best to tweak or tune. By that I mean we can embellish upon what we have or we can rethink that which isn’t working for us.

Much, I suppose, is dependent on whether or not we’re happy with the status quo. If we love what we have built, then perhaps it makes more sense to tweak in the hopes we can get something a skosh better. If, on the other hand, we’re struggling with sonic problems, maybe it’s better to rethink the setup.

For example, if we have a turntable high-end audio system and, for the most part, records sound great then we’re probably best advised to tweak the various tonearm/cartridge settings to compensate for minor problems. But, if we’re not getting the promise vinyl has to offer, then it’s time to rethink the system components—to tune by either equipment swapping or a radical rearrangement.

All too often I have run into systems tweaked to within an inch of their life with gadgets, process, bells and whistles, when what was needed instead was a radical tuning or equipment swap.

I think it’s part of human nature to want to make smaller course corrections than wipe a slate clean, but it’s also human nature to suffer through a situation because we’re hesitant to make the big change.

Tweaking, polishing, refining are small changes we can leverage to make what’s working better.

Tuning, replacing, rearranging are big changes we often need to make but more often than not shy away from.

To get to where you want to go, do you tweak or tune?

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Rethinking what’s normal

For all of my life, I have never thought of restaurants as anything but places you go to get served and have someone else cook your meal and wash the dishes. Simple. Normal.

Only, now I think of them very differently because I have come to realize their focus is on gathering crowds. My focus is on food and service.

With the pandemic lingering on for possibly another year or two, it’s unlikely I will consider eating in a closed space with a bunch of strangers.

What changed for me was the realization that the word “restaurant” was so ingrained in my psyche to mean one thing—food and service—that as soon as it dawned on me their model is fostering public gatherings, everything changed. It’s the food and service I am after. It’s the masses of people they want.

This brings me to the idea behind the post. In days of yore—the 70s and 80s—the norm was for people to have stereo systems. Few among us had televisions, but almost no one was without a vinyl-based stereo rig, ie. a turntable, or record player.  I mean, it was almost unthinkable, and yet not that many years later, those of us still enjoying our stereos are somehow in the minority. Weird, right?

The good news for me is that remembering back to those long-ago days when my speakers were powered with a cheesy Kenwood integrated and sourced from a rickety old AR table with a MM cartridge, I can only imagine how bad that must have sounded compared to what floats my boat today.

“Normal” is such a transitory state. It doesn’t mean that it’s right, it just means that it’s what passes for working at any given snapshot in time.

Our normal today will be odd tomorrow.

Now, let me get off the computer and go enjoy some tunes!