Tag Archives: turntable

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

RMAF is gone, but PS Audio has introduced a loudspeaker and its expensive, although moderately expensive by today’s luxury standards.

Opening day

With apologies, I am writing this post a day before you actually get to read it. It’s not always easy to juggle all the balls I have in the air and sometimes it’s the best I can manage.

Opening day at a trade show is mixed with both excitement and nerves. Excited because it’s new, fresh and shiny. Nervous because you never know how your efforts and those of your team are going to be accepted. And I can lovingly say our team just knocked it out of the park.

My wife Terri’s in charge of our shows and she directs every aspect of the design and how the room finally looks. And thank goodness for that. If it were left up to me there’d be a stereo system plunked down at one end of the room, a gaggle of folding chairs, and a stack of media in an otherwise empty room. Terri makes our place beautiful.

I’ll have more for you as the show progresses and we get things sorted out, but for today I am sharing a couple of photos and offering an assessment of the sound. Wow! The AN3s are just kicking ass. Dynamics and imaging like we’ve never had at a show in our 45-year history. Wowsers!

And LP’s? With our new Stellar Phono connected to a Lyra cartridge on VPI’s amazing 40th turntable, and Darren and my friend Jim McCullough’s hand picked vinyl, I gotta say it’s impressive. I think this is the first time we’ve spun vinyl in a quarter of a century. Amazing.

Hope you can stop by if you’re in the area.

 

Asheville, Walnut Cove, Biltmore Forrest and Western North Carolina’s Audio and Home Theater specialists present Cane Creek AV and Paul McGowan – PS Audio, Intl.

Chain repair

A generous helping of maple syrup can improve the taste of a bad pancake but it can’t promise perfection.

Ridding yourself of an audio problem by replacing one piece in your system’s chain is a tempting proposition. Sometimes it’s just what the stereo doctor ordered. But, more often than not, we get a bit of a boost that never quite addresses the problem.

Customers often send me a list of their systems in the hopes I can point to the weakest link in the chain. It’s sometimes painful to make a suggestion when I can see the real problem isn’t a particular link but the chain itself.

We tend to build our stereo and video systems around an idea or a particular piece, perhaps a favorite amplifier or turntable. We’re then building our chain in support of a few links and what we wind up with is a less than a great chain.

I am most pleased when a person shows me their system and everything’s spot on with just a few exceptions. The joy of recommending a particular piece of kit that will link the pieces together and sing to the heavens is always welcome.

If we’ve built a solid chain, replacing a single link can make all the difference in the world.

How strong is your chain?